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Many things could have been prevented in the story if ..

Huge mammals persist to this day, although the spread of humans was coincident with the with the exception of those in Africa and, to a lesser extent, Asia. The five-to-seven-metric-ton browser formed a guild common to dinosaurs mammals, and is probably related to metabolic limits and the relatively low calorie density that browsing and foraging affords. Sometimes, the similarity between dinosaurs and mammals could be eerie, such as and , which is a startling example of , which is the process by which distantly related organisms develop similar features to solve similar problems. They were even about the same size, at least for the most common ankylosaurs, which were about the size of a car. Ankylosaurs appeared in the early and succeeded all the way to the Cretaceous’s end. Glyptodonts appeared in the and prospered for millions of years.

Exactly as I have been wishing I could articulate (as articulately) myself. You are my hero!

In light of all those paths that have led to nowhere, why do I think that my attempt will not be another dead end? It could well be, but it is at least a new route and it should be harmless, which I highly value; I have seen enough carnage in this lifetime and do not want to be responsible for any more .

Real things are worse than imaginary things like ..

But how do we know this is reality? Couldn’t you be an agent of the far right adapting the same tactics.

The energy from controlled fire allowed humans to , , and socially organize in new ways. Humans commandeered energy that otherwise and used it for immediate human benefit. It was also the first great human robbery. All heterotrophs “” energy from other life forms to live. The primary exception is the symbiosis that . But no animal had ever robbed energy from ecosystems on that scale before. By making fires, humans were liberating many times the energy that their biological processes used - energy that could have fed forest ecosystems. While humans were only using deadwood, it was the least destructive to forest ecosystems. But when humans began burning forests to flush out animals to kill and make biomes suitable for animals to hunt, they were destroying and altering ecosystems on a vast scale. A cord of wood provides about four years of the calories that fuel a human adult’s body, and one hectare can provide a sustainable annual harvest of about ten years of human calories. A family of four using a hectare for firewood on a sustainable basis would be using more than twice their caloric intake for burning wood. Very little of that released energy would benefit humans if they burned it over a campfire, as humans did for the entire epoch of the hunter-gatherer; that liberated energy largely went straight into the sky. The direct benefit to humans would be the energy that went into cooking food, what warmed human flesh, what was used to make tools, and the benefits of scaring off predators and providing light at night. More indirect benefits would have been ecosystem changes to provide human-digestible calories, such as American Indians burning the woodlands and plains to make environments conducive to animals that they could easily hunt. In , the earliest epochs are the most uncertain, but saying that hunter-gatherer humans used 2.5 times their dietary calories in their economy is probably, perhaps greatly, understating the case. That 5% efficiency number is also a rough estimate, and both numbers could be refined by a scientifically performed effort. Maybe somebody has already done it. The numbers in that table for subsequent epochs are more accurate, and the most accurate of all are those for , and I live in one. The increases in efficiency became more modest with each epoch as the limits of were approached.

If habilines began to control fire two mya, one thing is certain: the australopithecine Tesla who banged the first rocks together that fashioned a stone tool, and who was able to continue doing it and eventually taught others, probably via active demonstration and their observation, could not have imagined that his/her invention would lead to a relatively giant descendant (or cousin of a descendant) that slept on the ground, controlled fire, and would quickly migrate to the ends of Earth and traverse distances that were incomprehensible in australo-Tesla’s time. That relatively quick series of innovations, never before seen on Earth, gave birth to a creature that would have simply been unrecognizable to that ; it would have appeared magical. There have only been a few subsequent Epochal Events in the human journey, and like the first one(s), they were all energy events above all else, and were all dependent on humans gaining the technological prowess and social organization that enabled them to exploit a new energy source, which was dependent on their increasing mental feats. Each time, the human reality after the Epochal Event was to the humans who lived immediately before it (, , ). Also, the events and their aftermaths became far more dramatic each time, in shrinking the event’s timeframe and shortening the time until the next Epochal Event, and the energy levels greatly increased each time, and by an order of magnitude for the most recent event.

Could this time have been different? - The Washington …

was a “raid”? I mean, OK, it’s Wikipedia, and may have been personally edited by Noam Chomsky to make America look bad, but still.

You never explained your plans for the US “taking the oil it needs”, btw. Was Wildmonk’s observation that the fact that America hadn’t done so was evidence for its good intentions the point you meant to make? I had the impression that you were suggesting something a little more assertive at some point in the future, in response to my idea that using nukes out there could backfire on you somewhat.

White Science does not really know what energy ; it can only describe its measurable effects. At its root, there are two primary components of our universe: energy and consciousness. Our universe may have (and even if it did not, matter appears to be comprised of energy), and consciousness may be required for our universe to exist at all, which may be part of the . Energy and matter may be manifestations of consciousness, and large brains could be simply more refined “transducers” for more complex consciousness to manifest in physical reality. In summary, everything physical is made of energy and our consciousness is all that we , but the that the nature of consciousness is not something that today’s science is equipped to study. There is evidence that evolution is not purely the province of chance mutations, but that organisms can affect their evolution at the genetic level.

Do you really think I was treated well by my things could have been worse essay peers
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things would have been much worse when we came in than they were

The explains plenty, and one reality is that women will always have a genetic investment in their offspring no matter who the fathers are. As civilizations rose and , they all had enhanced reproductive rights (many wives, harems, etc.), and many women found the situation tolerable and even attractive, although there could be coercion in the unions and there are many obvious disadvantages to being a "kept" woman. However, being a wife/concubine for an elite man usually meant a pretty good life and children being provided for. The biggest losers in such societies were non-dominant men, who had diminished procreation opportunities (and eunuchs guarded harems, for instance). With the rise of DNA testing, a repeating dynamic is seen: when one people at a higher economic level (energy use) encountered another, the women from the poorer culture bred with the men from the richer culture, and men from the poorer culture began vanishing from the gene pool. It is particularly noticeable among agriculturalist expansions into hunter-gatherer lands, such as the and from the Fertile Crescent into Europe and North Africa, and seems to be implicated in the spread of Mesoamerican farmers into the USA's Southwest. The general pattern during the Neolithic Expansion seems to have been farmers migrating to arable land and establishing agricultural communities that were surrounded by hunter-gatherers, and it seems more common that the farmer populations expanded and displaced (the men)/absorbed (the women) the hunter-gatherer population than hunter-gatherers learned agriculture. After a career of studying human migrations, Peter Bellwood had this to say about what motivated them:

How 9/11 Could Have Been Prevented | Alternet

Only when economic surpluses (primarily food) were redistributed, first by chiefs and then by early states, did men rise to dominance in those agricultural civilizations. Because the rise of civilization in the Fertile Crescent is the best studied and had the greatest influence on humanity, this chapter will tend to focus on it, although it will also survey similarities and differences with other regions where agriculture and civilization first appeared. Whenever agriculture appeared, cities nearly always eventually appeared, usually a few thousand years later. Agriculture’s chief virtue was that it extracted vast amounts of human-digestible energy from the land, and population densities hundreds of times greater than that of hunter-gatherers became feasible. The , but today it is widely thought that population pressures led to agriculture's appearance. The attractions of agricultural life over the hunter-gatherer lifestyle were not immediately evident, at least after the first easy phase, when intact forests and soils were there for the plundering. On the advancing front of agricultural expansion, life was easy, but as forests and soils were depleted, population pressures led to disease, "pests" learned to consume that human-raised food, and agricultural life became a life of drudgery compared to the hunter-gatherer or horticultural lifestyle. Sanitation issues, disease, and environmental decline plagued early settlements, and not long after they transitioned from hunter-gatherers to farmers, but the land could also support many times the people. Another aspect of biology that applies to human civilization is the idea of . Over history, the society with the higher carrying capacity prevailed, and the loser either adopted the winner’s practices or became enslaved, taxed, marginalized, or extinct. On the eve of the Domestication Revolution, Earth’s carrying capacity with the hunter-gatherer lifestyle was around 10 million people, and the actual population was somewhat less, maybe . On the eve of the Industrial Revolution in 1800, Earth’s population was , and again was considered to be about half of Earth's carrying capacity under that energy regime. No matter how talented a hunter-gatherer warrior was, he was no match for two hundred peasants armed with hoes.

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